More Widgets

Once I got started designing the Math Widgets series I realized it was going to be a lot of fun.  The study of mathematics is an immensely broad topic and for kids who are really into math it is wonderful if a teacher can provide enrichment experiences that introduce new ideas and concepts that go beyond “what’s on the test”.  The Math Widgets series is a collection of tools with these kids and teachers in mind.

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Math Widgets III explores some special concepts in number theory.  For example, the Multibase Abacus piques one’s interest in alternative number systems.  What if we only had 8 fingers instead of 10?  Would we use a base 8 system?  With the Multibase Abacus students can investigate base 8 and any other base from 2 to 10.

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On the Multibase Abacus, numbers are represented by tapping beads to add or subtract values from the columns of various place value systems.  In the example below we are showing a base 5 system.  Starting on the right we have the ones place labeled with 50.  Moving to the left we have 5’s, 25’s, 125’s, 625’s etc.  Tapping one of the column labels results in a bubble showing the value of the place in base 10.  In the quiz mode students are challenged to represent randomly selected numbers in randomly selected bases.  Quite a few skills come into play when trying to answer the questions posed by the Multibase Abacus, including: estimation, addition, subtraction, multiplication and using exponents.

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Clock Arithmetic is another topic in math that is perfect for an enriched curriculum.  Whenever we divide two integers there is always a remainder (sometimes it’s zero).  Clock Arithmetic is a widget that encourages student’s to explore this concept which is known as Modular Arithmetic.  In programming languages there is a special operator used to signify the modulus function.  If a=7 and b=3 then in computer code a%b returns 1 since one is the remainder when 7 is divided by 3.  Sometimes the word ‘mod’ is used instead of the “%” symbol to describe this calculation, for example 15 mod 12 is equal to 3.  In the example below, tapping the 2 is the correct response.

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Once in a while, but rarely, you might find a newspaper article about a mathematician solving a problem or finding a proof that has been elusive for hundreds of years.  For example, the conjecture  that no three positive integers ab, and c satisfy the equation an + bn = cn for any integer value of n greater than 2. The cases n = 1 and n = 2 have been known to have infinitely many solutions since antiquity.  First conjectured by Pierre de Fermat in 1637, this theorem had been the focus of study by mathematician for centuries and was finally proven in 1995 by Andrew Wiles.  Goldbach’s Conjecture has never been proven. It was first posed in a letter from Goldbach to Euler in 1742.  The conjecture posits that every even integer greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two primes.  Use the Goldbach’s Conjecture widget to explore this idea by finding the primes whose sum is the given even numbers.

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The Hexagon Arithmetic Widget is a six number system that uses emojis as the symbols.  Counting moves in a clockwise direction around the hexagon.  The object is to complete the addition table using logic to figure out the pattern.

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Math Widgets I, II and III are offered exclusively by the iTunes App Store and sells for $1.99.  Please visit our website for more information about these and other apps for education.

 

Fraction Builder

I submitted Fraction Builder to iTunes yesterday and it was approved in less than an hour!  It is so amazing to me what great service Apple offers to developers.  I certainly appreciate the way that the App Store provides access to my work to students and teachers all over the world.

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In most of my math apps I try to make them icon-based so that language skills are not critical for working with concepts.  Fraction Builder has a series of icons across the top of the screen.  Tapping each icon results in a specific function.

For example, tapping the red dice generates a random fraction.  Denominators range from 1 to 12.  Once the denominator is set, numerators can be any number that results in a proper fraction.

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When the question mark is tapped, a question is generated and displayed on a moveable note.  To answer the question students drag number tiles to make the fraction.  Usually it is best to start with the denominator.  If using this app in a classroom, the teacher should explain that the denominator represents the number of equal parts.  For this example, the student would first slide the three tile to the denominator position.  Next, the student should slide a one to the numerator position.  Once the numerator and denominator have been properly set, the students should tap the check mark.  When this icon is tapped the app compares the students answer to the correct answer for the question.

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A scoreboard displays student progress as they work with the app.  It shows the topic, number of questions attempted and the percent correct.  Quiz questions are based on three main topic areas:

• Naming Fractions

• Equivalent Fractions

• Comparing Fractions

Various other functions are performed when other icons are tapped.  This chart explains the other functions.notebook

I hope that teachers will let me know if they are interested in evaluating this app for use at their school.   I have a limited number of download codes for FREE evaluation copies of this app.   For some students learning about fractions is difficult.  It is my hope that this colorful interactive app will help them in their journey to master fraction concepts.

 

Just in Time for Halloween

What could be more fun that having your monster be chased by three other monsters?  Well that’s the theme of my latest math game.title

Ziggy, Spot and Pete are the three monsters that you want to avoid.  Harry is your monster and is controlled by tapping arrows on the iPad version or swiping the Siri Remote on the tvOS version.  The tvOS version also supports the use of a game controller so Harry can be moved using a compatible gaming device.

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The object of the game is to move Harry to the correct answer for a math problem shown at the bottom of the screen.  Anytime that  Ziggy, Spot or Pete run into Harry as they bounce around the screen, Harry loses a unit of energy.  Fortunately when Harry gets an answer correct he gets a unit of energy back.  The goal is to score ten points before running out of energy.

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Teachers and parents will like the wide range of problems.  Problems are randomly generated so the game is different every time it is played.  Skills are organized and defined using the Common Core Standards.  Look Out! Monsters! is a fast-paced game specifically designed to help kids get quicker at doing mental arithmetic.  A limited number of free promotional codes are available by request.  The app is offered exclusively by the iTunes App Store and sells for $0.99.  Please visit our website for more information about this and other apps for education.

Skills Chart

1
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Add within 20 Integers from 1 to 10 
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2
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Add within 20. Integers from 5 to 20
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3
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Add within 20. Integers from 10 to 20
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4
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Add within 20. Integers from 1 to 20 
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5
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Subtract within 20. Integers from 1 to 10
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Operations and Algebraic Thinking Subtract within 20. Integers from 1 to 20 
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7
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Determine the unknown whole number in an addition equation. Integers from 1 to 20
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8
Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number. Integers from 1 to 100 and 1 to 10
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9
Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Given a two digit number mentally find 10 more or 10 less. Integers from 10 to 100 and 10
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10
Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences) Integers from 10 to 90
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11
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. Integers from 0 to 20
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12
Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. Integers from 0 to 100
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13
Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. Number Range: Integers from 0 to 1000
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Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900. Number Range: Integers from 10 to 100 and 100 to 900
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15
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Fluently multiply within 100. Factors from 0 to 10
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16
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Fluently divide within 100. Divisors and Quotients from 0 to 10
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17
Number and Operations in Base Ten Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. Dividends from 10 to 1000 and Divisors of 10 or 100
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18
Operations and Algebraic Thinking Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols. Integers 1 to 10
5.OA.A.1
19
Expressions and Equations Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Integers 1 to 10
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20
Expressions and Equations Solve real-world and mathematical problems by writing and solving equations of the form x + p = q and px = q for cases in which p, q and x are all nonnegative rational numbers. Integers 1 to 10
6.EE.B.7

 

Classroom Spinners

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Teachers need lots of tools in their arsenal when it comes to teaching any subject, especially math.  The use of a spinner is a great way to introduce math concepts related to probability.  The Classroom Spinners app provides teachers with six different types of spinners that can be configured to have sections with color or no color.  The sections can be labelled with numbers or letter.  The sections can also be unlabelled.

Tapping the info button brings up a screen explaining the various functions of the app.

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The Classroom Spinners screen shown below is configured to have six sections.  Each section has a different color and the sections are labelled with letters.  Many different investigations of probability theory can be explored using this setup.

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For example, here are a few questions to ask the students:

  1.  What is the probability of landing on a vowel?
  2. What is the probability of landing on A,B, or C?
  3. If the last five spins were A,A,C,A,A, what is the probability of the next spin being the letter A?
  4. What is the probability of getting an B on the first spin and E on the second?
  5. If you spin 10 times about how many times would you expect the letter D to occur?

Tapping the sigma icon will display a table of the Experimental Outcomes:

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In this experiment the letter C was randomly selected 4 times.  The Theoretical Probability for any given letter is 16.7%.  What do you think will happen to the Experimental Outcome for the letter C if 90 more spins are performed?  Theoretically, how many times will C occur if  the experiment is run 1,000 times?

Classroom Spinners is a useful tool for teachers to have in their tool bag.   Check it out and let me know what you think.